Are they right?


Rabbi Asked Does Islam Teach Jews are Apes? Rabbi Tovia Singer Answer


BarK Mitzvah by the filthy REFORM movement.

If you want to really learn what it is to be Jewish Click Here or Here.


Caroline Glick The American Jewish Community’s Moment to Choose

There is a total lack of Jewish Education in America, when Jews can’t even remember the words to Hava Nagila and the “rabbi” does not even know what a bracha (blessing over something you eat, smell or see) is and why you thank Hashem (G-d). In America, did the Greeks win in Hanukkah?


Sophia’s the pomeranian’s Bark Mitzvah w/Lee Day & Rabbi Otis on Nat Geo Wild Spoiled Rotten Pets
Comment: Have the reform gone to the Dogs?

  • If a Dog or Cat has a Bar or Bat Mitzvah, then he or she can have an Aliyah (being called up to the Torah).
  • If they can have an Aliyah, then they can be counted in a Minyan (Prayer quorum).
  • If they can be counted in a Minyan, then they can lead the Prayers.
  • If they can lead the Prayers, then they can hold other functions such as Temple President.
  • If they can be Temple President, then they can be “Temple rabbi”.
  • If a Cat or Dog can be “Temple rabbi”, then why not a Robot?
  • If a Robot can be “Temple rabbi”, then why not a Pig?
  • If a Pig can be a “temple rabbi”, then they can conduct a Jewish Wedding.

Idgie’s Cat Mitzvah – Hava Nagila

There is a total lack of Jewish Education in America, when Jews can’t even remember the words to Hava Nagila and the “rabbi” does not even know what a bracha (blessing over something you eat, smell or see) is and why you thank Hashem (G-d). In America, did the Greeks win in Hanukkah?

If you want to really learn what it is to be Jewish Click Here or Here.

How to celebrate and understand Hanukkah: Chabad, Breslov

And now something for an American Hanukkah.

Just a reminder: You DO NOT give presents on Hanukkah or have a Hanukkah bush.

Just a reminder: You DO NOT give presents on Hanukkah or have a Hanukkah bush.

Cookbook:Deep Fried Mars Bar

A deep-fried Mars bar is an ordinary Mars bar normally fried in a type of batter commonly used for deep-frying fish, sausages, and other battered products. The chocolate bar is typically chilled before battering to prevent it from melting into the frying fat, though a cold Mars bar can fracture when heated.

The dish originated at chip shops in Scotland as a novelty item, but was never mainstream. Since various mass media have reported on the practice since the mid-1990s, in part as a commentary on urban Scotland’s notoriously unhealthy diet,[1] the popularity of the dish has spread. The product has not received support from Mars, Inc who said “deep-frying one of our products would go against our commitment to promoting healthy, active lifestyles.”[2]

This recipe for the deep fried Mars bar illustrates a typical procedure. The ingredients in the dish’s variations may vary indefinitely, but the procedure will remain more or less the same. For authentic flavor, fry the treat in beef drippings rather than vegetable oil (it is worth noting the high saturated fat content this method of cooking involves).
Ingredients

1 UK or Canadian Mars Bar or 1 US Milky Way Bar
1 cup milk
1 cup flour
1 egg
Enough oil to fill the pot or fryer you are using (oil or fat can be used as well as suet for authenticity)

Procedure

Chill, but do not freeze, the Mars bar by leaving it in a fridge, or freezer, for a short while.
Mix the milk, flour and egg in a bowl.
Whisk together to create a creamy batter.
Heat the oil.
Coat the Mars bar completely in batter.
Lower into hot oil (around 350-375 degrees Fahrenheit, 175-190 Celsius) and fry until batter is golden brown. (Note: be careful to lower it gently; otherwise the batter may come off)
Serve.

If you want a real Hanukkah come home to your Homeland, Israel and see what Hanukkah is really about.


Israeli doughnut “sufganiyot” Chanukah Taste Test | Nefesh B’Nefesh

Strawberry Mango Sufganiyot

http://www.leahcookskosher.com/show_recipe.php?id_recipe=21

*I’m adding this comment on November 25, 2013 – I decided to shoot a ‘how-to’ video for this recipe. Apparently, I’ve simplified things a bit over the years and put the dough together as I do my challah and yeasted sweet dough. Dry ingredients in the bowl and then add the liquids. Since I make these without dairy, I don’t heat the soy milk on the stove thinking soy milk probably doesn’t need to be scalded. (NOTE: in the video, I say “milk” and I should have said “soy milk”) So, I melt the margarine in the microwave, add the soy milk to cool it to an appropriate temperature (125′ for rapid dry yeast) and just mix it into the dry ingredients. Watch the video and you’ll see what I mean!)

Sufganiyot are the coveted sweet for Chanukah. We never made them commercially at the bakery as I feared how many sufganiyot would be ordered….and, feared my staff’s reaction if I asked them to make thousands. Another reason we didn’t make them is that I’m a purest. I love these fresh out of the oil. I usually have my fill eating the duds; the blobs of dough dropped into the oil to test the temperature. As with many things I make, my pleasure is in watching others eat something I know they can’t get anywhere else.

Program director and students at Cafe Levine, Hillel UW.
Many recipes are similar so I opted to use one from my 1963 copy of McCall’s Cook Book"" . It is the bible of cookbooks in my family. My mother, four sisters, BFF (Best Friends Forever), daughter and niece all have this book. Vintage early 1960’s is the best. I have multiple copies; each successive find at Goodwill as thrilling as I imagine winning the lottery would be. Of course, sufganiyot are “Jelly Filled Donuts” or even “Bismarks” in the index. The World of Jewish Entertaining"" by Gil Marks has a similar recipe with good tips. This is another must have cookbook I frequently reference.

In my recipe steps, I’ve inserted many pictures to demystify the process; don’t be frightened! Ultimately, these are easy to make.  Have the kids help knead and roll the dough, and cut them out. You do the frying. Offer an assortment of fillings; I’ve used a gourmet jam here. But, a chocolate hazelnut spread or whipped marshmallow filling sound great to me! That is a perfect Chanukah party.

Kosher Status: Parve
Number of servings: 15
Main Ingredient(s): Flour – Unbleached All Purpose
Preparation Time: 01:00
Cooking Time: 00:10
Skill Level: 3 (1 Easy – 5 Hard)
Estimated POINT value:
Average Rating: 5/5


Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup soy milk (or milk for dairy version)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup margarine (or butter for dairy version)
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 2 packages active dry yeast (4 teaspoons)
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • Oil for frying (canola or grapeseed)
  • Strawberry – mango jam

Steps:

Heat milk in small saucepan until bubbles form around the edge of pan; remove from heat. Add sugar, salt, and butter; stir until butter is melted. Let cool to lukewarm or,  130′ if using instant yeast.

Combine 2 cups of flour, yeast, nutmeg in a large bowl. Add the milk mixture, eggs and the water. Beat until smooth, about 2 minutes.

Add most of the remaining flour, mixing by hand to form a soft dough. Add flour as necessary so dough is not sticky.

Put dough on work surface and knead until smooth, just a couple of minutes.

Cover with a towel and let rise in warm place until double in bulk, about 1 hour. When you press 2 fingers into the dough and it keeps the indentation, the dough is ready.

After dough has risen, punch down and knead for 2 minutes. Invert the bowl over the dough and let the dough rest for 10 minutes.

Roll out the dough into 1/2″ thickness. If the dough resists being rolled, cover and let rest for a minute or so. Continue to roll to an even thickness.

Cut out donuts using a 2 1/2″ round cutter. Reroll the trimmings, letting dough rest if necessary. Cut out additional donuts. Cover with towel and let rise for another hour until double in thickness.

Slowly heat 2″ – 3″ of frying oil in a heavy skillet to 375 degrees. I use a flatbottomed wok on the gas range. Drop 3 – 4 donuts into the heated oil. They will sink, bubbles will form and the donut will rise to the top. Let it cook for about 1 1/2 minutes and then gently turn them over using a slotted spoon. Let cook about 1 1/2 minutes longer. The correct oil temperature is important. Too hot, the donut browns to quickly and will be raw in the middle. Too low, the donut will absorb too much oil and be heavy.

Gently remove from oil and drain on papertowels.

Fill pastry bag fitted with 1/4″ round tip with jam of preference. I’m using Strawberry Mango.

With a small paring knife, cut a slit about 1 1/4″ long into the center of the donut. Insert the tip of pastry bag and squirt in about 1 teaspoon jam.

Dust with granulated or powdered sugar. Enjoy!

It’s time to come home! Nefesh B’Nefesh: Live the Dream 1-866-4-ALIYAH UK 0800 075 7200 Come home to the Land of Emuna

Nefesh B'Nefesh: Live the Dream 1-866-4-ALIYAH UK 0800 075 7200 Come home to the Land of Emuna

Click the Banner for www. nbn.org.il

Sephardic Hanukkah foods

by Dec 11, 2012 http://www.sheknows.com/food-and-recipes/articles/978717/sephardic-hanukkah-food-recipes

Beyond latkes

In the U.S., Ashkenazic Jewish foods (like gefilte fish, matzo ball soup and latkes) are the most well known. This Hanukkah, look to Sephardic Jewish traditions to revitalize your holiday menu.
Sephardic Jews are originally from the Mediterranean and Iberian Peninsula, hailing from places like Greece and Spain. After the Spanish Inquisition, Jews were expelled from Spain, and so the Sephardic community was dispersed and many ended up in Turkey, and as far as Africa. Where Ashkenazic Jews traditionally spoke Yiddish, Sephardic Jews spoke Ladino, a hybrid of Spanish, Hebrew and a number of other languages.

Sephardic foods differ greatly from their Ashkenazic cousins, reflecting their Mediterranean heritage. For Hanukkah, Sephardic Jews also celebrate with menorahs and fried foods, but the recipes differ. Here are a few favorites to inspire you this Hanukkah.

Sephardic keftes de prasas (leek patties) recipe

Keftes de prasas

Whereas kofte, popular in Turkey and the Middle East, are meatballs, Sephardic keftes (also known as keftikes) are more like patties and very often do not contain meat. Keftes de prasas, or leek patties, are one of the most popular varieties and are eaten at Rosh Hashanah, Hanukkah and Passover (for Passover substitute matzo meal for the breadcrumbs). Recipe below.

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds leeks, trimmed and cleaned
  • 1 egg
  • Salt
  • 1/4 cup breadcrumbs
  • Vegetable oil

Directions:

  1. Put the leeks in a pot of water, cover and cook over medium-low heat until very soft. Drain and cool.
  2. Put the leeks in a food processor and blend until smooth.
  3. Mix in the egg, salt and breadcrumbs. The mixture should be quite soft but just firm enough to form into patties.
  4. Put about 1/2-inch of oil in a pan over medium heat.
  5. Form the leek mixture into small, flat patties and drop in the oil. Fry until evenly browned and crispy on both sides.
  6. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and serve immediately (or keep warm in a 200 degree F oven).

Exotic Hanukkah Foods

Try something a little different – and very yummy!

by http://www.aish.com/h/c/r/Exotic-Hanukkah-Foods.html

Sephardic Latkes or Svinge

Svinge is the Sephardic answer to latkes, light and crunchy eaten sprinkled with confectioners’ sugar.

Rabbi Maimon the son of Yosef, the father of the Rambam (Maimonides) says that eating svinge is integral to the Hanukkah celebration. For a small batch – enough for six people combine

  • 11/2 cups of flour
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1 t instant yeast
  • 7/8 cup of warm water

Mix these into a batter.

Let the batter sit for three hours until it has doubled or tripled in size. Then heat oil in a frying pan – this is another deep fry dish. Wet your hands. Tear off plum-sized pieces of the dough. Stretch them a bit and form a hole in the middle and fry on both sides. Drain on paper towels, Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and eat right away.

Fried Fish Balls

Fried foods to recall the miracle of the flask of oil and fish is a traditional Shabbat food – so it’s a perfect Shabbat Hanukkah dish. In the UK, these fish balls are featured at all Jewish celebrations and for good reason – they are absolutely delicious and easy to make.

Defrost one roll of gefilte fish.

Add matzah meal one handful at a time, just enough to form the fish into walnut-sized balls. Deep fry about six minutes until browned on all sides.

(optional: add 1/4 t black pepper to the fish mix for a spicier fish ball)

Eat hot or cold. Yum!

Kuku Sabzi

This is a Persian frittata traditionally eaten on Hanukkah. Very healthy and very yummy.

  • 2-3 eggs.
  • Half a bunch of fresh coriander
  • Half a bunch of fresh parsley
  • Quarter of a bunch of fresh dill
  • Half an onion or three scallions

Chop all the vegies fine.

Lightly grease a ceramic nonstick frying pan (2 tablespoons of vegetable oil or ghee).

Lightly beat the eggs.

Add spices, salt, pepper, turmeric to taste.

Chop the herbs and onions or scallions are finely as you can – use fresh or frozen, never dried. You can also substitute fresh spinach leaves for the herbs.

Combine the herbs with eggs.

Pour the mixture into a heated greased frying pan. Fry until lightly browned, then flip over.

Cut the kuku into wedges and served with yogurt and rice or crusty bread and feta cheese too.

Serves three. You can freeze this!

Lasagna

We eat dairy foods on Hanukkah to remember the bravery of Judith, the valiant Maccabee woman who slew the wicked Syrian Greek general Holofernes by first feeding him cheese to stimulate thirst and then wine to get him drunk. After that she beheaded him. The sight of his skull rolling through his tent frightened the Syrian Greeks so much that they ran away and the Maccabees won the war.

I love this recipe. You don’t precook the noodles or the sauce. You just layer everything and it all bakes together until a tinfoil blanket. Easy and delicious.

  • 1 large can of crushed tomatoes (800g or 19 oz)
  • 1 large can of tomato paste (not sauce) also 19 oz.
  • Combine and add 1/2 t garlic powder
  • 2 t oregano
  • 1 t basil
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/4 t black pepper

Thin the sauce with a little bit of water. Don’t cook this, just mix ingredients in a separate bowl.

Combine 16 oz or 750 grams of cottage cheese, ricotta cheese or white cheese (or any combination of the three – three Israeli cottage cheese packages are okay) with one egg.

Layer sauce, noodles, cottage cheese, two big handfuls of grated cheese (I use low fat mozzarella). REPEAT. Last layer is noodles and sauce.

Bake in a 9×12 inch pan covered well with tin foil for one hour at medium heat (350F or 180C).

For the last 10 minutes of baking, uncover and add two handfuls of grated cheese to the top so the cheese can melt and look pretty.

Latkes

Here’s a cooking lesson cast in rhyme
So your latkes can rock at Chanukah time.

Latkes are a part of our history
I’m going to unlock the mystery

Of how to make them crisp and light
For your guests to eat on Chanukah night.

Rule #1 – don’t skimp on oil
¼ inch in the pan, bring it close to boil

Rule #2 – make your latkes of equal dimension
Don’t crowd them in the pan
They need personal attention

Rule #3 – when they’re brown then flip
Fry other side, and then place on towel to drip

Rule #4 – eat right away
Your latkes will be soggy if you wait another day.

Rule #5 – don’t forget to smile
Let the Chanukah light shine on you for a while.

My Latkes Recipe

Using the grating attachment on your food processor, grate together

  • 1 small onion,
  • 4 large potatoes,
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup matzah meal.
  • Add 1/8 t black pepper and 1 teaspoon salt.

Heat oil in a heavy bottomed skillet. Make sure the entire skillet is covered with oil 1/4 inch or more deep.

Drop in a tiny bit of batter. If it browns then you’re ready to fry.

Spoon in latkes. Don’t crowd.

Fry three minutes on each side. Remove, place on paper towel to drain excess oil and serve ASAP!!

You can reheat in a low oven and serve later ,or if you really have to freeze, but nothing tastes as good as fresh.

Safety note: turn frying pan handles inward and never leave a frying pan full of hot oil alone even for a minute. Also don’t let the oil smoke because that will spoil your latkes.

Bimuelos

Probably the most traditional Sephardic Hanukkah food, bimuelos are fried dough puffs. As Claudia Roden writes in The Book of Jewish Food, “Bimuelos is the Judeo-Spanish name for the little flour-and-yeast fritters. In Egypt, where they were sold on the street, they were called ‘zalabia,’ and in Iraq, Persia and India they were ‘zengoula.’ All over the Middle East they were eaten at Hanukkah.” Whatever you want to call them, these sweet dumplings will steal the show at any meal.

Doughnuts

Dough:

  • 1 cup water
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon grated orange zest (optional)
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
  • 4 eggs

For frying:
Mild flavored oil

For dusting:
Granulated sugar, or a blend of sugar and cinnamon

OR
For filling:
Orange marmalade at room temperature, with or without toasted chopped walnuts

For syrup:

  • 1 cup water
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup honey (optional)

Directions

1. Sift together the flour and baking powder and set aside.

2. Put the water, butter, sugar and salt (and orange zest, if using) into a saucepan and bring it to a boil. Add all the flour at once and stir vigorously with a wooden spoon, just until the ingredients are blended and the dough pulls away from the sides of the pot, then STOP! Set the pot aside for two minutes.

3. Pour oil to a depth of three inches into a heavy gauge saucepan. Heat the oil to 375°F. Unless you have a deep fryer, I strongly advise using a candy thermometer to monitor the oil temperature, which will fluctuate rapidly and wildly as you cook. Too hot and the oil will burn, burning the bimuelos with it. Too cold  – anything lower than 350°F – and they won’t expand properly or cook thoroughly inside without overbrowning.

4. Add the eggs to the still-warm dough one at a time, blending each in thoroughly with a wooden spoon before adding the next. The dough will be very shiny and sticky, but there should be no runny egg left.

5. Dip two soupspoons into the hot oil. Scoop up a tablespoon of dough with one, use the other to nudge the dough into a globe shape, and slip it into the hot oil. Cook no more bimuelos at one time than can float freely without crowding, in a single layer in the oil. At first they’ll sink like a stone, then float up to the surface. Leave them to cook on one side, until medium golden. When they’re cooked on one side, bimuelos usually roll over by themselves, but might not if the pot is crowded. If they don’t, coax them with tongs, and finish browning on the other side.

6. Remove them with tongs as they are done. They will not need draining on paper. If you’re not filling them, roll immediately in a bowl of sugar, or sugar and cinnamon. If you’re going to fill them, set them aside to cool slightly, then gently prod open like a clamshell, spoon in the filling and shut them again.

7. To make the syrup, bring the water to a boil, add the sugar, and reduce until slightly thick but still runny. Blend in the honey off the stove, if using, without letting it boil.

Serve the bimuelos soaked in syrup, or pour the syrup in small bowls for dipping.

Fried Zucchini

Recipe created by SheKnows on May 30, 2011

Prep: 10 min
Cook Time: 15 min
Serving: 4-6 servings

A tasty parmesan breaded zucchini patty side dish.
Ingredients

  • 3 large zucchini, grated
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 tube round, buttery crackers, crushed
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

Directions

Combine the ingredients in a bowl and season with the salt and pepper.
Drop spoonfuls of batter into a skillet with oil. Fry for 15 minutes, until browned on both sides.

Precipizi

In addition to pollo fritto, Italian Jews also celebrate Hanukkah with precipizi. These lightly sweetened dough balls are fried and dipped in honey that hardens to create a satisfying and sticky exterior. Get the recipe below!
Precipizi (Italian fried dough balls) recipe

Makes 20-24 dough balls
Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1-3/4 cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons rum or other clear spirit
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • Powdered sugar (optional)

Instructions:

In a large mixing bowl, combine the eggs, flour, sugar, olive oil and rum. Knead until you get a smooth, soft dough.
Shape into 20-24 small balls about the size of olives.
Heat the vegetable oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pan over high heat.
Add the dough balls and fry until golden on all sides, working in batches if necessary (do not crowd the pan). Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate as they finish cooking.
Carefully wipe the pan clean with a paper towel and add the honey.
When the honey is hot, add the dough balls back into the pan and stir to coat.
Pour onto a baking sheet and allow to cool. As they cool the honey will harden slightly.
To serve, arrange however you’d like (they make a pretty tower) and top with powdered sugar, if desired.

Cheese Bourekas

Recipe by: GCBENEZRA
“Middle-Eastern style puff pastry pockets filled with cheese. Great served as an appetizer or the traditional Israeli way for breakfast with salad, olives, cheese, and plain yogurt. Could also be filled with leftover mashed potatoes, or a spinach and feta mixture.”
Ingredients
12 servings 294 cals

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1 pinch garlic powder
  • 1 pinch onion powder
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper
  • 1 (17.5 ounce) package frozen puff pastry
  • 2 teaspoons water
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds

Add all ingredients to list
Directions
Prep 30 m
Cook 30 m
Ready In 1 h
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a baking sheet.
Beat 1 egg in a medium bowl, and mix in the cheese. Season with parsley, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and pepper.
On a lightly floured surface, cut each sheet of puff pastry into 6 equal squares to give 12 squares in total. Beat the remaining egg with water in small bowl. Brush edges of each square lightly with egg wash. Place a heaping tablespoon of the cheese mixture in the center of each square. Fold pastry over the filling, and seal edges with a fork. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet, brush with remaining egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
Bake in the preheated oven 30 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve immediately.

From the OU

Fried Macaroni & Cheese

Andrea Reynaldo | Dairy https://oukosher.org/recipes/fried-macaroni-cheese-dairy/
Ready In: 11 hours Prep Time: 35 minutes
Wait Time: 10 hours
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

A totally over the top recipe but my friend swears it’s amazing

  • Ingredients
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon salt (divided)
  • 2 cups elbow macaroni
  • ½ cup milk
  • 12 oz. processed cheese
  • 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • Black pepper
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 cups crackers
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • Pot of oil

Instructions

Grease a 9×13-inch pan.
In large saucepan, bring water and 1/2 teaspoon of salt to boil. Add pasta and cook 6 to 8 minutes, drain well.
In a large bowl, combine hot pasta, 1/2 cup milk, cheeses, 1/2 tsp salt, and pepper. Stir until cheese is melted and then spoon the mixture into prepared baking dish.
Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or until firm.
Scoop out large Tablespoons of the mixture and roll into 1” balls and place them on a baking sheet, freeze for 2 hours.
In a small bowl, whisk together eggs and remaining milk.
In a separate bowl combine crushed crackers and corn meal.
Dip the macaroni balls into the egg mixture, and then roll them in the crumb mixture.
Heat about 2 to 3 inches of oil in a deep fryer or sauce pan. Fry the macaroni and cheese balls for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown. Drain on paper towels.


Hanukkah – In Those Days, at This Time.

‘You All Come from Israel,’ Netanyahu Tells Olim

Nefesh B’Nefesh | A Family Makes Aliyah | NBN

IMTI (Im Tirtzu) Who We Are

 

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