Yom Hazikaron: יום זיכרון We Remember and Honor our fallen

Yom Hazikron

Yom Hazikron

Soldiers saluting the Israeli Flag: “We Remember and Honor our fighting men and women and ..WE SALUTE YOU!
An Army of Cats and Hamsters: “Even now… secret forces are gathering against the storm of those who would try to destroy the defenders of the free world. Those forces strike fear into the hearts of the enemy. On Land.. and ”
A Navy of Sharks as far as the eye can see…:”in the sea!”
A squadron of Birds fly over the Kottel:”And in the sky!” “We now are waiting for Moshiach!”

The coming into being of a Jewish state in Palestine is an event in world history to be viewed in the perspective, not of a generation or a century, but in the perspective of a thousand, two thousand, or even three thousand years.” (Winston Churchill)

יום הזכרוןYom Hazikaron

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaYom Hazikaron (יום הזיכרון לחללי מערכות ישראל ולנפגעי פעולות האיבה‎, lit. Day of Remembrance for Israeli Fallen Soldiers and Victims of Terrorism) is Israel’s official Memorial Day. The national observance was enacted into law in 1963. While Yom Hazikaron has been traditionally dedicated to fallen soldiers, commemoration has now been extended to civilian victims of the ongoing armed dispute.

The Miracle of Ad Halom

By: Rabbi Lazer Brody

Israel’s Memorial Day, Yom HaZikaron, begins this year on Sunday evening, April 14, 2013. Israel never forgets its debt of eternal gratitude to its sons and daughters who gave their lives for the achievement of the country’s independence and its continued existence. It is a day of collective and personal heartache mingled with awe and honor for our holy martyrs.

When looking at Israeli military history, most people consider the Six-Day War of 1967 as Hashem’s greatest miracle of modern times. My choice would be the War of Independence of 1948-49.

The “Ad Halom” Memorial commemorates the courageous soldiers that sacrificed their lives to stop the advancement of the Egyptian Army northward in the Israel Independence War of 1948

In the initial stage of the War of Independence, the Egyptian, Syrian, Iraqi and Jordanian armies scored notable successes. It looked like the tiny Jewish nation would be finished before it began its modern-day rebirth. The formidable Egyptian army – backed by tanks, artillery, armor and aircraft, which Israel did not have – were able to cut off the entire Negev and to occupy parts of the land that had been allocated to the Jewish state, reaching as far north as Ashdod.

The Jordanian Legion succeeded in defending their key position in Latrun after a bloody aborted attempt by an untrained and inexperienced Israeli assault force that included quite a few Holocaust survivors that had recently arrived in Israel from the deportation camps of Europe. They also overran and captured Gush Etzion.

The Iraqis had almost reached the Mediterranean and the Syrians were dangerously near Haifa. Jerusalem, with 100,000 Jews was virtually cut off from the rest of Israel. Hacked to pieces in this way, Israel was not very far from collapse in June of 1948.

The_Miracle_of_Ad_Halom“The Pillbox” – the Hagana gun emplacement that guarded the Ad Halom bridge outside of Ashdod

The Israeli Army then was not much more than new immigrants from Europe and Morocco with a few kibbutznik commanders. Many of the soldiers had no firearms. Some had never shot a rifle and had little idea of what to do in a battle. If a “rare” machine gun broke down or needed assembly, it was necessary to wait for a rare expert to come along who knew how to assemble and repair machine guns.

Most of the Israel’s soldiers had had little or no training. Thousands of them were new immigrants rushed off the boats and given guns, most unable to speak Hebrew and understand commands.

The Egyptian Army dealt a nasty blow to the Givati brigade in the Battle of Nitzanim, a mile south of Ashdod. It looked like nothing could stop the Egyptians from reaching Tel Aviv; then, the war would be over and so would the State of Israel, Heaven forbid.

The morale of the Egyptians was high and the Egyptian press and people were already celebrating. First, they seized Gaza, then Majdal (Ashkelon), then Beersheba and now Nitzanim with Ashdod next on the list. By Egyptian calculations, Israel’s ill-equipped armies and settlements would fall swiftly. Egypt also hoped to reach the Ramle area to link up with the Arab Legion’s forces at Latrun. Such a move would be a mortal blow to the Jewish forces.

Yet Hashem had other plans. An Egyptian column of some 500 vehicles was making its way up the Coastal Road towards Tel Aviv. The column was confronted by a bold company of Givati soldiers who had miraculously exploded the sturdy Turkish bridge over the Lachish river at the Southern entrance of Ashdod to delay the Egyptian advance. Barely 20 miles separated the enemy from its objective.

With no time to waste before the Egyptians could circumvent the bombed out “Ad Halom” (“up to here” in Hebrew, the northernmost point of the Egyptian thrust into Israel) bridge, Israel tried its first aerial attack. Lou Lenart, an experienced American volunteer, was selected to lead the historic mission. He was joined by Moddy Alon, Ezer Weizman, and Eddie Cohen.

Each plane swooped down on the enemy with two 70-kg bombs. They tried to strafe the Egyptian column despite heavy ground fire. Unfortunately, the Messerschmitts’ untested 20 mm cannons and machine guns jammed quickly and the few rounds that they fired didn’t inflict much damage. But the psychological effect was enormous. The surprised Egyptians thought they were being hit by a massive air bombardment. They panicked and scattered all over the adjacent sand dunes. By the time they regrouped, they had lost the offensive.

Israel’s outnumbered Givati forces seized the opportunity to launch a counterattack. With Hashem’s loving grace, they stopped the advance in its tracks.

The Turkish Bridge (Rebuilt) over the Lachish River at the Ad Halom crossroads – if the Egyptian Army’s progress would not have been thwarted here, then nothing would have stopped them from reaching Tel Aviv

The price of success was high: Eddie Cohen, a South African-born pilot, was killed when his Messerschmitt – apparently hit by anti-aircraft fire – crashed and burned trying to land after the mission. As a result, the First Jewish Fighter Squadron lost one-fourth of its aircraft and one-fifth of its pilots on its maiden combat sortie.

Eddie Cohen of blessed memory was not the macho type of pilot. Indeed, he was contemplative, calm, scholarly, never daring, and never reckless or adventurous. This anti-hero was the Israeli Air Forces’s first heroic martyr. He merited being Hashem’s emissary in the formidable miracle that turned the tide of Israel’s War of Independence.

With an army that wasn’t an army, an air force that wasn’t an air force, and a pilot that preferred classical music and archeology to flying warplanes that weren’t much more than souped-up Piper Cubs, Hashem chose to perform the miracle of Ad-Halom on the outskirts of my beloved hometown of Ashdod.

“They have their chariots and they have their horses, but we shall call the Name of Hashem our G-d!” (Psalm 20:8).

Yom Hazikaron: Israel’s Memorial Day

This day honoring fallen soldiers, immediately precedes Israel’s Independence Day.

By

The fourth of Iyar, the day preceding Israel’s Independence Day, was declared by the Israeli Knesset (parliament) to be a Memorial Day for those who lost their lives in the struggle that led to the establishment of the State of Israel and for all military personnel who were killed while in active duty in Israel’s armed forces. Joining these two days together conveys a simple message: Israelis owe the independence and the very existence of the Jewish state to the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for it.

Yom Hazikaron Israel Memorial Day

Yom Hazikaron, the Israeli Memorial Day, is different in its character and mood from the American Memorial Day. For 24 hours (from sunset to sunset) all places of public entertainment (theaters, cinemas, nightclubs, pubs, etc.) are closed. The most noticeable feature of the day is the sound of a siren that is heard throughout the country twice, during which the entire nation observes a two-minutes “standstill” of all traffic and daily activities. The first siren marks the beginning of Memorial Day at 8 p.m., and the second is at 11 a.m., before the public recitation of prayers in the military cemeteries. All radio and television stations broadcast programs portraying the lives and heroic deeds of fallen soldiers. Most of the broadcasting time is devoted to Israeli songs that convey the mood of the day.

“Magash Hakesef” (The Silver Platter), a poem written by Nathan Alterman during the 1948 War of Independence, was during the 1950s and ’60s the most common reading for Yom Hazikaron ceremonies. The poem attained a status almost similar to Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in U.S. culture.


The Silver Platter

Natan Alterman

And the land grows still, the red eye of the sky  slowly dimming over smoking frontiers

As the nation arises, Torn at heart but breathing, To receive its miracle, the only miracle

As the ceremony draws near,  it will rise, standing erect in the moonlight in terror and joy

When across from it will step out a youth and a lass and slowly march toward the nation

Dressed in battle gear, dirty, Shoes heavy with grime, they ascend the path quietly

To change garb, to wipe their brow
They have not yet found time. Still bone weary from days and from nights in the field

Full of endless fatigue and unrested,
Yet the dew of their youth. Is still seen on their head

Thus they stand at attention, giving no sign of life or death

Then a nation in tears and amazement
will ask: “Who are you?”

And they will answer quietly, “We Are the silver platter on which the Jewish state was given.”

Thus they will say and fall back in shadows
And the rest will be told In the chronicles of Israel


During the ’70s, especially following the Six-Day War (June 1967) and the Yom Kippur War (October 1973), numerous new poems and songs commemorating fallen soldiers became popular and often replaced “The Silver Platter” in public ceremonies. “Hare’ut” (“Friendship”), a song composed a year after the 1948 war, had an impressive comeback in the 1980s and ’90s. The late prime minister Yitzhak Rabin considered this poem/song to be his favorite.

להקת הנח”ל – שיר הרעות

Almost every high school in Israel has a “memorial corner” with the photos of the school graduates who fell in battle or while on military duty. Some high schools organize their own Yom Hazikaron ceremonies and invite the families of the fallen graduates to participate. The unique atmosphere of the day is enhanced by the sight of teenagers and children, all dressed in white shirts and blue pants or skirts, on their way to school, and thousands of soldiers in uniform on their way to the military cemeteries.

The list of fallen soldiers becomes longer every year. The inevitable tendency of radio and television programs is to focus on individual stories of soldiers who lost their lives in recent decades, rather than on those who fought in the pre-state undergrounds and 1948 war, who have fewer surviving immediate family relatives today.

Yom Hazikaron is not conceived as a religious commemoration by the majority of Israelis, but as part of the civil culture. The siren sound seems to inspire awe and sanctity no less than any traditional religious ceremony.

Outside of Israel, Yom Hazikaron is commemorated as part of Israel Independence Day observance. There is usually a short memorial or a moment of silence preceding the communal Yom Ha’atzmaut celebration. In synagogues that observe Yom Ha’atzmaut, a special reading may be added to the service, often preceding the Kaddish [memorial prayer].

Inoffensive Savagery

The historic AFDI pro-freedom campaign that changed the discourse and finally had press, politicians and pundits calling savages savages (not militants, insurgents, resistance blah blah blah). We took a lot of heat, but the truth won out.

The historic AFDI pro-freedom campaign that changed the discourse and finally had press, politicians and pundits calling savages savages (not militants, insurgents, resistance blah blah blah). AFDI took a lot of heat, but the truth won out.

On Jan. 29, 2004, 11 people lost their lives and 50 were wounded in a suicide bombing on Egged Bus 19 in Jerusalem. Since that tragic incident, the remains of Bus 19 have travelled around the world as a reminder of the horrors of terrorism. First stopping at The Hague for the International Court of Justice hearing regarding the Israeli West Bank barrier, the wreckage was then brought to the United States, where it toured among various cities, college campuses, synagogues, and churches.

On Jan. 29, 2004, 11 people lost their lives and 50 were wounded in a suicide bombing on Egged Bus 19 in Jerusalem. Since that tragic incident, the remains of Bus 19 have travelled around the world as a reminder of the horrors of terrorism. First stopping at The Hague for the International Court of Justice hearing regarding the Israeli West Bank barrier, the wreckage was then brought to the United States, where it toured among various cities, college campuses, synagogues, and churches.

Shmuel HaNavi bus bombing From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Shmuel HaNavi bus bombing was the suicide bombing of a crowded public bus (Egged bus 2) in the Shmuel HaNavi quarter in Jerusalem, Israel, on August 19, 2003. Twenty-four people were killed and over 130 wounded. Many of the victims were children, some of them infants. The Islamist militant group Hamas claimed responsibility for the attack.

Shmuel HaNavi bus bombing
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Shmuel HaNavi bus bombing was the suicide bombing of a crowded public bus (Egged bus 2) in the Shmuel HaNavi quarter in Jerusalem, Israel, on August 19, 2003. Twenty-four people were killed and over 130 wounded. Many of the victims were children, some of them infants. The Islamist militant group Hamas claimed responsibility for the attack.


Israeli Ministry of Immigrant Absorption ad – Boyfriend – with English subtitles

This flags are flags of the Nazi Youth Organisation "Hitler-Jugend", regional branch of Palestine. The historical context to the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin Al-Husseini.

This flags are flags of the Nazi Youth Organisation “Hitler-Jugend”, regional branch of Palestine. The historical context to the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin Al-Husseini.

Every Israeli will understand this message. Will the Americans understand what we have to go through both as Civilians and in the Military? Just because someone is not in uniform does not mean they are not a target for an Arab Nazi (Fatah, Hamas, Hezbollah ect.) terrorist.

Iktiba High school posts picture presenting Hitler as admirable

Iktiba High school posts picture presenting Hitler as admirable

The Arabs have always been Nazis and they are still Nazis.
This will not stop until Israel either transfers then or goes for Total Victory like the Allies did during World War II.

For Example: Soviet reprisals

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the Soviet occupation zone, thousands of youths were arrested as “Werwolves”.[53][54] Evidently, arrests were arbitrary and in part based on denunciations.[53] The arrested boys were either “shot at dawn” or interned in NKVD special camps.[53] with an total “Isolation policy“.

The Soviet authorities enforced a policy of total isolation of the inmates from the beginning. A decree of 27 July 1945 reads: “The primary purpose of the special camp is the total isolation of the contingent therein and the prevention of flights”, and prohibits all mail and visitors.[12] Another decree of 25 July 1946 confirmed the “total isolation from the outside world” as a primary purpose, and further reads:

“[Inmates of special camps] are to be isolated from the society by special measures, they are not to be legally charged, and in contrast to the usual procedure in legal cases, their cases are not to be documented.”[13]

Mother Rachel testimony from IDF soldiers

Eli Groner, Israel’s PMO Director General – Israel`s 69 Independence Day in LA

שערי שמים . Gates of Heaven

 

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